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Compute [clear filter]
Tuesday, November 4
 

16:40 CET

Orchestrating Docker with OpenStack
The Nova driver for Docker has been maturing rapidly since its mainline removal in Icehouse. During the Juno cycle, substantial improvements have been made to the driver, and greater parity has been reached with other  virtualization drivers. We will explore these improvements and what they mean to deployers.

Eric will additionally showcase deployment scenarios for the deployment of OpenStack itself inside and underneath of Docker for powering traditional VM-based computing, storage, and other cloud services.

Finally, users should expect a preview of the planned integration with the new OpenStack Containers Service effort to provide automation of advanced containers functionality and Docker-API semantics inside of an OpenStack cloud.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Windisch

Eric Windisch

Software Engineer at Docker, Inc., Docker, Inc
Eric Windisch is a veteran contributor to OpenStack across multiple projects. He is best known for his contributions of ZeroMQ messaging and the Docker virt driver for OpenStack Compute. Eric also initiated the oslo.db effort and is a co-author of the OpenStack Security Guide.


Tuesday November 4, 2014 16:40 - 17:20 CET
Room 242AB

17:30 CET

Scaling Ironic
Rackspace's OnMetal launched in July as the first and only deployment of Ironic on the public cloud. Rackspace has since scaled Ironic to manage thousands of servers in a multitenant environment.

This talk will discuss the challenges we faced while deploying and scaling OnMetal. Ironic's architecture allows for a straightforward HA model and horizontal scaling, but there were (as always) performance issues that set our team back while growing our production environment. These issues came to life on both the Nova and Ironic side of the control plane.

This talk will also cover how we brought a new deploy model to Ironic that fixed some core architectural issues with the default deploy driver, while also allowing Ironic to do more interesting things with hardware that it manages.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Rollenhagen

Jim Rollenhagen

Software Developer
Jim Rollenhagen has been working with OpenStack since early 2014,  when he joined the Ironic project and helped found the  Ironic-Python-Agent project. He continues to work primarily on the  Ironic project where he is a core reviewer, but also dabbling in Nova  and Neutron. In... Read More →


Tuesday November 4, 2014 17:30 - 18:10 CET
Room 242AB
 
Wednesday, November 5
 

09:00 CET

Beyond 86: Managing Multi-platform Environments with OpenStack

In this talk we will look at real-world scenarios deploying and managing workloads in a multi-platform environment of compute architectures including IBM System z (traditional mainframe), POWER, and Intel architectures.  Moving beyond a homogeneous data center to a mix of enterprise architectures adds potential complexities around hypervisor support, deployment capabilities, and management of disparate workloads--of which some might be CPU-centric while others are not.

Attendees will gain understanding in the following topics:

  • OpenStack regions
  • Federated identity with Keystone
  • Challenges in building a multi-platform, multi-region OpenStack deployment

Speakers
avatar for Phil Estes

Phil Estes

Distinguished Engineer & CTO, Container & Linux Strategy, IBM
Phil is a Distinguished Engineer in the office of the CTO for IBM Cloud, guiding IBM's strategy around containers and Linux. Phil is a founding maintainer of the CNCF containerd runtime project, and participates in the Open Container Initiative (OCI) as a member of the Technical Oversight... Read More →
avatar for Shaun Murakami

Shaun Murakami

Software Engineer, IBM
Shaun Murakami is a Senior Cloud Architect and Technical Lead for the IBM Cloud Performance team located in Silicon Valley, California. As part of the Cloud Performance team, Shaun has worked with many customers, helping them transform their business using Cloud Computing technologies... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 09:00 - 09:40 CET
Room 242AB

09:50 CET

Under the Hood with Nova, Libvirt, and KVM (Part Two)
The Libvirt driver for Nova is one of the most comprehensive implementations across all supported hypervisors.  It is quite common for new functionality to be added Libvirt before other drivers.  During Part One (http://bit.ly/1tUZocH), we began to scratch the surface of this topic, and now it's time to get into the weeds. 

During this session, we will dive into more detail about Nova, Libvirt and QEMU: 

Commonly overlooked configuration considerations for Libvirt/QEMU.

Which areas of the Nova Libvirt driver are most brittle and why?

What happens when operations fail of complete impartially? How can we recover?

Libvirt s interface into QEMU s Monitor Protocol (QMP).

Live migration, block migration, migrate and suspend: What are the differences and how do they work?  What parts is Nova handling, versus Libvirt and QEMU?

Understand Libvirt s XML-based instance definitions.

If you missed my talk in Atlanta and are planning to attend Part Two, I encourage watching the video.  We ll be picking up right where we left off.

The Libvirt driver for Nova is one of the most comprehensive implementations across all supported hypervisors.  It is quite common for new functionality to be added Libvirt before other drivers.  During Part One (http://bit.ly/1tUZocH), we began to scratch the surface of this topic, and now it's time to get into the weeds. 

During this session, we will dive into more detail about Nova, Libvirt and QEMU: 

 



  • Commonly overlooked configuration considerations for Libvirt/QEMU.



  • Which areas of the Nova Libvirt driver are most brittle and why?



  • What happens when operations fail of complete impartially? How can we recover?



  • Libvirt s interface into QEMU s Monitor Protocol (QMP).



  • Live migration, block migration, migrate and suspend: What are the differences and how do they work?  What parts is Nova handling, versus Libvirt and QEMU?



  • Understand Libvirt s XML-based instance definitions.




If you missed my talk in Atlanta and are planning to attend Part Two, I encourage watching the video.  We ll be picking up right where we left off.


 



Speakers
RK

Rafi Khardalian

CTO, Metacloud, Metacloud
Rafi Khardalian is Chief Technical Officer and a member of the founding team at Metacloud. Prior to joining Metacloud, Rafi was the Director of Systems Architecture at Ticketmaster Entertainment. He was responsible for driving innovation while designing highly scalable, globally distributed... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 09:50 - 10:30 CET
Room 242AB

11:50 CET

Glance Artifacts: It's Not Just for Images Anymore


Various Openstack services often need to catalog different objects they use to

operate. Such objects may contain various data as well as metadata needed for

identification and description.

Images used by Nova to run the VMs are just the best known examples of such

objects. Other examples include Heat templates, Solum Plan Files, Mistral

Workbooks, Murano Application Packages etc.

"To catalog" means to have the following functionality:

  * To store the object reliably

  * To guarantee its immutabity once it is stored

  * To provide search capabilities to find the objects in catalog

  * To return the detailed info about the requested object

  * To allow fetching the object for usage by a Service

  * To control the access to the object: enforce usage and modification

    policies, sharing and publication scenarios etc

  * To manage the object lifecyle

Obviously, this set of functionality is common for different kinds of objects,

and is usually unrelated to the primary mission of respective projects using

these objects.

That is why it is suggested to have a dedicated service which will provide the

catalog functionality for other OpenStack services. As Glance already serves

as a catalog of Images for Nova, it is suggested to extend its mission so it

may serve as a catalog for other services as well.

The objects stored in the catalog are called *Artifacts*, and the catalog

itself *Artifact Repository*.

Various Openstack services often need to catalog different objects they use to operate. Such objects may contain various data as well as type-specific metadata needed for identification, description, and processing by the target service.

Images used by Nova to run the VMs are just the best known examples of such objects. Other examples include Heat templates, Solum Plan Files, Mistral Workbooks, and Murano Application Packages.

During the Juno development cycle, work has started to extend Glance to support these other "Artifacts" via a plug-in system. Heat templates are the first artifacts to be supported in Juno with several other plug-ins planned for the K development cycle.

This talk will cover the motivations and general architecture for artifact plug-ins as well as a general roadmap for further enhancement and development.

Speakers
avatar for Randall Burt

Randall Burt

Senior Software Developer, Rackspace
Randall Burt is a Senior Software Developer and services architect for the Rackspace cloud who has been instrumental in launching new services at Rackspace. After spending years contracting for the government, Randall joined Rackspace with a passion to contribute to open source technolgies... Read More →
avatar for Alexander Tivelkov

Alexander Tivelkov

Principal Software Engineer, Mirantis, inc
Being a Core developer in Glance and Murano projects, Alexander is driving the Artifact Repository initiative and is one of the architects in the development team of Application Catalog Service for OpenStack. Alexander has more than 10 years of experience in Software Development in... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 11:50 - 12:30 CET
Room 242AB

16:30 CET

Hardware in the Cloud: Cleaning up after Bare Metal Ironic Tenants
The purpose of this presentation is to discuss decommissioning bare metal nodes in Ironic using the Ironic Python Agent. Jay and Josh, Core Reviewers for IPA, will discuss why decommissioning is important, in single and multi-tenant environments, how IPA and Ironic coordinate the decom process, and some of the pitfalls of working directly with hardware. Users expect a consistent platform when deploying their apps using the cloud -- including bare metal cloud. In order to provide that, Ironic must cleanup behind previous tenants, or prepare new hardware to ensure a clean slate for the next instance. Josh will provide an overview of how IPA works with Ironic to coordinate decommissioning in a pluggable way. Jay will talk about the difficulties of working with bare metal, and some pitfalls to avoid when implementing your hardware manager. Both Jay and Josh have months of experience running Ironic w/IPA in production for Rackspace OnMetal and want to share some of those lessons with the larger Openstack community.

 

This talk will be jointly presented by Jay Faulkner and Josh Gachnang, core reviewers on Ironic-Python-Agent, as well as developers for Rackspace OnMetal.

Speakers
avatar for Jay Faulkner

Jay Faulkner

Linux Engineer, Rackspace OnMetal, Rackspace Hosting
Jay Faulkner, a Linux Engineer with Rackspace OnMetal, is responsible for hardware validation and managing fleets of servers. He became an Openstack developer in March of 2014 when the ironic-python-agent was accepted into Ironic.
avatar for Josh Gachnang

Josh Gachnang

Software Developer, Rackspace OnMetal, Rackspace
Josh Gachnang is a software developer at Rackspace, building OnMetal. He is an active contributor to Openstack Ironic, and a core reviewer and one of the original authors for the Ironic Python Agent. He wants to build the Software Defined Datacenter and loves automation. Josh lives... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 16:30 - 17:10 CET
Room 243

16:30 CET

Multi-Cell OpenStack: How to Evolve Your Cloud to Scale
With OpenStack clouds growing to thousands of hypervisors and becoming geographically distributed, the Nova cells functions are being used to take on some of the challenges of running the largest OpenStack implamentations. 

Some of the major users of cells functionality will present their use cases which led to them to install more than one cell, covering planning, scheduling, configuration, limitations and upgrades. We will also cover the areas of ongoing work and enhancements to make it easier to use multiple cells.

 

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bell

Tim Bell

Infrastructure Services Manager, CERN
Tim is currently responsible for the team at CERN that manages the operating system and infrastructure services. He previously worked as a Unix kernel developer at IBM and managing large-scale Unix production deployments and services for Deutsche Bank. As part of CERN's data centre... Read More →
avatar for Belmiro Moreira

Belmiro Moreira

Cloud Engineer, CERN
Belmiro Moreira is an enthusiastic software engineer passionate about the challenges and complexities of architecting and deploying Cloud Infrastructures in very large-scale environments. He works at CERN and during the last two years his main role was to design, develop and build... Read More →
avatar for Sam Morrison

Sam Morrison

Cloud Architect, NeCTAR, University of Melbourne
Sam Morrison is the Technical lead for the NeCTAR Research Cloud, which spans 9 different datacentres across Australia. In this role he is responsible for coordinating the technical team's activities in each location, in addition to OpenStack customisation work. As happy managing... Read More →
avatar for Matt Van Winkle

Matt Van Winkle

Senior Manager, Operations, Rackspace
I serve an amazingly talented group responsible for running the Rackspace public cloud. I have been with the company in various roles for over 13 years.  My primary task is helping my teams of engineers and developers build the software that manages our constantly growing fleet of... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 16:30 - 17:10 CET
Amphitheatre Bleu

17:20 CET

Taking the Long View: How the Oslo Program Reduces Technical Debt
In the fast-paced world of OpenStack development, we often focus on short-term needs like bug fixes and new features. The Oslo Program takes a longer view of the health and sustainability of the project. Our mission is to make OpenStack more maintainable by addressing cross-project code reuse and architectural issues. In this presentation we will cover the origins of Oslo and the processes and tools the team uses to improve OpenStack from the bottom up, making it easier to deploy, more approachable for new contributors, and sustainable for long-term use.

 

Speakers
avatar for Doug Hellmann

Doug Hellmann

Senior Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Doug Hellmann is currently employed by Red Hat to work on OpenStack and OpenShift.
avatar for Mark McLoughlin

Mark McLoughlin

OpenStack Technical Director, Red Hat, 1980
Mark McLoughlin is Technical Director for OpenStack at Red Hat and has spent over a decade contributing to and leading open source projects like GNOME, Fedora, KVM, qemu, libvirt, oVirt and, of course, OpenStack. Mark is a member of the OpenStack Foundation board of directors, and... Read More →


Wednesday November 5, 2014 17:20 - 18:00 CET
Amphitheatre Bleu